Emotional Intelligence Test


At one point I ran into a site with all kind of tests; www.emode.com.

Below are the results which depict my EQ on July 20th 2000.
(My guess is that your EQ changes over time so it might be of importance to know when I took this test)

The test, results and explanation(s) are created by Ilona Jerabek with
Copyright 1996-1999 Queendom.com All rights reserved
Copyright 1999-2000 Emode.Com, Inc. All rights reserved.

Below are two results;
The one from Emode and another from Queendom QueenDom new_tiny.gif (144 bytes)
Although they were taken at totally different times, you will see they bear some similarities :)

 


QueenDom


Your Emotional IQ Test results

There is no arguing that classical IQ, as measured by most intelligence tests, is important in our personal, academic, and professional success. However, emotional intelligence matters as much as the classical IQ. One could almost say that emotional intelligence is a prerequisite for the proper development and actualization of our other intellectual abilities.

Simply put, we need to learn to recognize and label our feelings and needs, reconcile them with our long-term goals and with the needs and feelings of other people involved. And we need to cultivate the ability to identify ways of meeting our goals and needs and to soothe our own feelings. Then, we need to motivate ourselves and mobilize all our internal (energy, effort, discipline, perseverance, resilience) as well as external resources (building social networks through effective communication, social insight, empathy, reading other's emotions, setting boundaries).

Overall score: 126 points  (population mean = 100; SD = 15; min = 30; max = 145)
Behavioral aspect: 124 points  (population mean = 100; SD = 15; min = 37; max = 144)
Knowledge aspect: 123 points  (population mean = 100; SD = 15; min = 37; max = 131)

Your Emotional IQ is excellent - much higher than average. That means that, in general, you express your feelings directly and with good timing. You are optimistic and positive, and adapt well to changed circumstances. You deal effectively with stress, interact, and communicate adequately. You are comfortable with yourself (including your sensuality and playfulness); you know and appreciate your talents and strong points as well as your weaknesses. You are able to motivate yourself, find the energy and the strength necessary to complete what you want or need done. You are one of the resilient people who bounce back after major drawbacks, survive hardship without bitterness, and still manage to give to others.

You seem to have mastered quite a bit of the theoretical knowledge necessary for full development of your emotional intellect. There is still room for improvement, though. The good news is that you can do something about it, even if you are a mature grown-up. And you can start right away!

Start with identifying your problem areas. Paying attention to your interactions with other people and to your self-talk is a good launching point, as is asking your friends and partner what bothers them about your behavior. Try to really listen, without being judgmental and defensive. Read some books about emotional intelligence, communication skills, social skills, stress/anxiety/anger management, self-esteem and self-growth in general (see the recommended books below). Enlist the help of a psychologist, your life partner, parents or/and a good, honest friend. You will be amazed at how good, strong and happy you will feel.

 


EMode


The short version


Emotional IQ

8.5 out of 10

less intelligent                                          more intelligent

Your Emotional IQ is excellent - much higher than average.
That means that, in general, you express your feelings directly and with good timing.
You are optimistic and positive, and adapt well to changed circumstances.
You deal effectively with stress, interact well, and communicate adequately.
You are comfortable with yourself, and that includes your sensuality and playfulness.
You know and appreciate your talents and strong points as well as your weaknesses.
You are able to motivate yourself, find the energy and the strength necessary to complete what you want or need done.
You are one of the resilient people who bounce back after major drawbacks, survive hardship without bitterness, and still manage to give to others.
Membership is fast and free.

 

 


The long version


Emode's got the lowdown. Read below for your detailed test results.

There is no arguing that classical IQ, as measured by most intelligence tests, is important in our personal, academic, and professional success. However, emotional intelligence matters as much as the classical IQ. One could almost say that emotional intelligence is a pre-requisite for the proper development and actualisation of our other intellectual abilities.

Simply put, we need to learn to recognise and label our feelings and needs, reconcile them with our long-term goals and with the needs and feelings of other people involved. And we need to cultivate the ability to identify ways of meeting our goals and needs and to soothe our own feelings. Then, we need to motivate ourselves and mobilise all our internal (energy, effort, discipline, perseverance, resilience) as well as external resources (building social networks through effective communication, social insight, empathy, reading other's emotions, setting boundaries).

 

Emotional IQ
8.5 out of 10

less intelligent                                          more intelligent


Behavioral
8 out of 10

less intelligent                                          more intelligent

 

Knowledge
9 out of 10

less intelligent                                          more intelligent

 

Your Emotional IQ is excellent - much higher than average.
That means that, in general, you express your feelings directly and with good timing.
You are optimistic and positive, and adapt well to changed circumstances.
You deal effectively with stress, interact well, and communicate adequately.
You are comfortable with yourself, and that includes your sensuality and playfulness.
You know and appreciate your talents and strong points as well as your weaknesses.
You are able to motivate yourself, find the energy and the strength necessary to complete what you want or need done.
You are one of the resilient people who bounce back after major drawbacks, survive hardship without bitterness, and still manage to give to others.

You seem to have mastered quite a bit of the theoretical knowledge necessary for full development of your emotional intellect.
There is still room for improvement, though. The good news is that you can do something about it, even if you are a mature grown-up. And you can start right away!

Start with identifying your problem areas.
Paying attention to your interactions with other people and to your self-talk is a good launching point, as is asking your friends and partner what bothers them about your behavior. Try to really listen, without being judgmental and defensive. Read some books about emotional intelligence, communication skills, social skills, stress/anxiety/anger management, self-esteem and self-growth in general (see the recommended books below). Enlist the help of a psychologist, your life partner, parents or/and a good, honest friend. You will be amazed at how good, strong and happy you will feel.

 


The Explantion


Most of us consider intelligence as a purely intellectual process, but recent research asks whether it doesn't combine both the head and the heart. In the late 1980s, Peter Salovey of Yale University and John Mayer of the University of New Hampshire coined the term "emotional intelligence." They were attempting to define a combination of certain human qualities like empathy, self-awareness, and emotional control.

According to Salovey, there are 5 components to emotional intelligence:

Knowing your emotions

The ability to identify emotions and put them into words. To have an emotional vocabulary. Many people feel uncomfortable expressing emotions, in particular negative ones like anger, fear, or jealousy. But ignoring them doesn't make these feelings go away - it just means we aren't communicating with others and ourselves.

Managing your emotions

Emotions can have a life of their own. Once we recognize them, we learn to control them. And they no longer control us. 'Internal' management helps up let go of negative feelings and internalize positive ones. 'External' management is how we turn our emotions into action or behavior.

Inhibiting and motivating your actions

Inhibiting reactions requires discipline, and remembering what your ultimate goal is in any situation. Motivating reactions require knowing what has to be done, and completing it. This skill directly correlates with academic achievement - the better you feel about your abilities, the more self-confident you are, and the more success you have.

Recognizing and validating emotion in others

Empathy; the ability to relate to other people. An emotional connection with others stems from this quality.

Handling relationships well

Involves skill relating to others. There are three components: leadership, being able to negotiate solutions, and connecting personally. Understanding how to connect with others allows you to increase the depth of a relationship, rather than coming across as superficial or controlling.

Emotional intelligence did not receive popular recognition until 1996, however, when a New York Times writer used the term in his book -- Emotional Intelligence , by Daniel Goleman, Ph.D. According to Dr. Goleman, emotional intelligence allows a true understanding of what life teaches us. It's the emotional internalization of knowledge and experience. To feel things, as well as intellectually know them. Knowing something in both the heart and the head lets simple knowledge become wisdom.

As explanation, Goleman (1996) uses the following analogy/anecdote:

A belligerent Samurai once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of Heaven and Hell. But the monk replied with scorn, saying "You're nothing but a lout, I can't waste my time with the likes of you." His very honor attacked, the Samurai flew into a rage and pulling his sword from its scabbard yelled, "I could kill you for your impertinence." "That," the monk calmly replied, "is Hell."

Startled at seeing the truth the master had pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the Samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight.

"And that," the monk replied, "is Heaven."

The monk instructed the Samurai, answered his question, and allowed him to emotionally experience his knowledge all at the same time. Thus, the knowledge became internalized and resulted in wisdom.

Much research has covered the emotional intelligence of children. One particular experiment is considered the original test of emotional intelligence. Walter Mishel of Columbia University designed the experiment in the 1960s, to test the ability to delay gratification. It's known as the "marshmallow test." The experiment determined children's ability to delay satisfaction and then measured what kind of effects this ability would have on their success later in life. Four year-old children were put into a room with a marshmallow on a table. They were told that if they didn't eat the marshmallow before the researcher returned, they would receive two. He then followed the personal and professional progress of these children for the next 20 years. Whoever showed the ability to delay gratification were much more successful in their later schooling and their careers. According to Goleman (1996), self-control in the face of a marshmallow at four was shown to be "twice as powerful a predictor of later academic prowess as IQ."

Research has shown that people with high emotional intelligence tend to do better in life than those with low EQ, even if their traditional IQ scores are lower. This has been attributed to two things: First, people with high EQ scores show more innovation and creativity in problem-solving. Second, people with high EQ scores related to others better than someone with low EQ scores. Emotional and mental flexibility is correlated to success, the results show.

Two big questions remain: can we accurately define and measure emotional intelligence. And can we teach it to those lacking in EQ? These questions frame current debate on the subject.

 

Additional Reading:

Cooper, R.K. and Sawaf, A. (1997). Executive EQ: Emotional Intelligence in Leadership and Organization. Perigee Publishers.
Goleman, D. (1996). Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More than IQ. Bantam Books.
Nagy, (1999). How To Raise Your Child's Emotional Intelligence: 101 Ways to Bring Out the Best in Your Children and Yourself. Heartfelt Publications.
Ryback, D. (1997). Putting Emotional Intelligence to Work: Successful Leadership Is More Than IQ. Butterworth-Heinemann Publishers.
Salovey, P. and Sluyter, D.J. (1997). Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence: Educational Implications. NY: Basic Books.
Segal, J. (1997). Raising Your Emotional Intelligence: A Practical Guide. Henry Holt Publishers.
Shapiro, L.E. (1998). How to Raise a Child With a High EQ: A Parent's Guide to Emotional Intelligence. NY: HarperCollins Publishers.
Simmons, S. and Simmons, J.C. (1997). Measuring Emotional Intelligence: The Groundbreaking Guide to Applying the Principles of Emotional Intelligence. Summit Publishing Group.
Steiner, C. and Perry, P. (1997). Achieving Emotional Literacy: A Personal Program to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence. NY: Simon & Schuster Publishers.
Weiseinger et. al. (1997). Emotional Intelligence at Work: The Untapped Edge for Success. NY: Jossey-Bass Publishers.